South Carolina Plant Conservation Alliance (SCPCA)

Category: Conservation


5-year reviews

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is initiating 5-year status reviews for eight species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.  If you have new information since the last 5-year review for any of the species listed below, please share…

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Reintroductions in FMNF

On February 8, Jeff Glitzenstein and others replanted several Schwalbea americana in the Francis Marion National Forest. These seedlings were grown from seed that Danny Carlson collected in 1987, back before the species was federally listed as endangered. The seeds…

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Plant Conservation Course – Online and Free!

The Center for Plant Conservation and San Diego Zoo have posted a free online Plant Conservation course. The course is intended to be a beginner’s course, so please share with new plant conservation hires or interns, students or anyone who…

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Three species of ferns found for the first time in South Carolina at Lake Jocassee

Patrick D. McMillan, PhD I am constantly surprised by the diversity we have yet to uncover in the Jocassee Gorges. One of the most profound discoveries was made over 80 years ago by botanists, William Chambers Coker, Henry Totten when…

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Introduced Biodiversity at the Colosseum

The most amazing Twitter thread…. When botanists started exploring the Colosseum in the 1800s, they discovered it was full of plants that were not at all native to the region. How did they get there? Could it have been as…

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Natural History is Back

Natural history, including botany, has been out of fashion at universities for years, pushed aside by biochemistry, genetics, and the sexy high-tech disciplines. Now it appears to be making a comeback. Undark reports that zoology, botany, and natural history are…

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Venus Flytraps – Endangered?

The Venus flytrap, one of the most distinctive plants on the planet and a South Carolina native, isn’t yet listed as an endangered species but it is certainly at risk. Venus flytraps grow in the coastal plain and sandhills, in…

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